WebGL: Frequently Asked Questions

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This is a list of frequently-asked questions about WebGL. It is not a tutorial -- if that's what you want, you can check out the Learning WebGL lessons.

Contents

Background and Getting Started

What is WebGL?

WebGL is a low-level JavaScript API giving you access to the power of a computer's graphics hardware from within scripts on web pages. It makes it possible to create 3D graphics that update in realtime, running in the browser. It's a web standard, so it doesn't need a plugin and will soon be available on many smartphones. Some people regard it as being part of the new 'HTML5' standard.

WebGL is managed by Khronos, an organisation which is responsible for a number of open standards.

How do I get WebGL running on my machine?

Right now, you need to install a special version of a web browser to use WebGL. You can get appropriate versions of Firefox, Chrome and Safari.

When will WebGL be ready for production use?

This is really three questions:

When will the WebGL specification get to version 1.0?

The WebGL Working Group have not announced a date, though they are very positive about how rapidly they are approaching a final version. Usefully, some of their deliberations happen on a public email list, so if you want to get a good feel for that current state, a good way to find out is to read the archives.

When will WebGL be available in the standard versions of web browsers?

Hopefully soon after the specification reaches 1.0! There are "pre-alpha" testing implementations in three of the major browsers, and because these implementations are following the specification as it evolves, so while the author of this FAQ can't make promises on behalf of the browser development teams, it doesn't look as if there will be much of a delay once the specification is ready.

When will enough people have WebGL in their browsers to make it work using on a website?

Naturally, this depends on the kinds of people who visit the site -- which browsers they use and how frequently they update them.

People who use Microsoft Internet Explorer will have specific problems with WebGL: as of this writing, Microsoft have not announced any intention of supporting it, so IE users will be reliant on a plugin. More about this in [#What about Microsoft?]

For users of Chrome and Firefox, there is interesting information about how rapidly they have upgraded to new versions in the past in this blog post. The short version: Chrome users will be automatically upgraded within a month or so of a new version's release; the Firefox upgrade will be slower to a greater or lesser extent depending on whether they package it as a major (eg. 4.0) or minor (3.7) release. Safari will be somewhere in between.

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